FAQS

DO I NEED A VET’S REFERRAL?

WHEN DO I NEED A VETERINARY PHYSIOTHERAPY TREATMENT?

Veterinary physiotherapy isn't just for injury or rehabilitation for post-operations. Through our daily routines of riding, stabling, haynets etc to competitions, horses are put under a lot of physical demands that can cause tension in muscles and affect their movement and behaviour. Having a maintenance session 2-3 times a year, just like you would a saddler, can help keep your horses soft tissue healthy and keep mobility.   

Section 19 of the Veterinary Surgeons Act (1966) outlines how the practice of veterinary medicine and surgery is restricted to RCVS members. An extension of this law is the Veterinary Surgery (Exemptions) Order (1962) states that: "any treatment by physiotherapy given to an animal by a person must be under the direction (i.e. prescription) of a veterinary surgeon. As such, it is important that a veterinary physiotherapist only treats an animal after referral from a veterinary surgeon. By treatment, we mean physiotherapy targeted at an already diagnosed condition, with the purpose of curing or improving that condition." This means that when treating a diagnosed condition a vet referral form is needed, but for maintenance work, it is not but a report can be sent to the vet if requested. 

HAD AN APPOINTMENT, NOW WHAT?

24hrs rest after the appointment is recommended, this will be advised and discussed on the day.

After the first session, it is recommended to have the follow-up session soon after to make sure that the exercises are the right fit for you and your animal as well as a second treatment to aid the body to heal. 

Support will always be available and encouragement to give me a call if you have any questions.

A report will be written up that can be sent to the vet, saddler, farrier, etc, when requested to promote collaboration and communication between professionals.  

DOES MY ANIMAL NEED TO BE CLEAN?

Having your horse clean and dry will give the best opportunity to give the best environment to assess and treat your horse.